Deducting Your Trip To India – Detailed Business Expense Guide

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Deducting Your Trip To India – Detailed Business Expense Guide

Feb 21, 2017 Posted by Sanjiv No Comments

Suppose that you have just arrived from a two week trip to Europe, where you were able to close some deals while visiting some old friends. You’re so happy not only because you were able to snag more business, but you were able to bring home some souvenirs for your family and friends. And of course, you were able to squeeze in some time for relaxation and got to see top sights like the Big Ben and the Eiffel Tower.

But did you know that you can even reduce your next tax bill by declaring your recent trip abroad? Indeed, jet setting can save you a significant amount of money, but only if expenses satisfy certain conditions.

Business Related Travel Expenses are Tax Deductible

According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), you can deduct ordinary and necessary expenses for travel away from home or business as long as these are connected with your business or job. This applies to both domestic and international travel.

What are ‘ordinary’ expenses? The IRS defines this as a common or accepted expense in your trade or business. For instance, you can consider the costs associated with distributing promotional literature like newsletters and holiday cards as ordinary expenses.

On the other hand, a necessary expense is defined as something helpful and appropriate for your business or work.  Your business trip, which allowed you to close new deals, can be considered as one.

The IRS says that for travel to be considered deductible, it should be ‘away from home.’ This stipulation is almost always  satisfied for international travel. The IRS will consider  you to be away from home if you are on travel outside your tax home (where you live or work)  for a time longer than a typical day’s work.

Keep in mind, though, that eligible deductions for business travel are only for temporary work on the road. If you spent more than a year on the road for a business travel, then it is considered an indefinite assignment and thus doesn’t qualify you for a tax liability. Even short assignments to the same place during a fiscal year may be considered by the tax authorities as an indefinite assignment.

Eligible Business Travel Tax Deductibles

Now you may ask—what are the travel related costs that you can normally deduct on your tax bill?

Among the travel related costs that you can deduct on your next tax bill are:

  1. It doesn’t matter whether you travel by plain or car; you can normally reduce the expenses related to getting to and from a business destination as long as it is not close to your tax home.

For example, you took a cab to get from the airport to the hotel where you met your client. You can deduct the cab fare as a work-related transportation cost. You can also declare car rentals, and even costs incurred when you took your own car (gasoline expenses, parking and toll fees, for example.) You can even claim the expenses of operating and maintaining a vehicle such as repairs, washing, oil change,  and tire replacement as tax deductibles.

What if your client provided you with a free ticket? Or a friend in London gave you a ride? Obviously, you can’t declare these as deductibles.

But what if you took an ocean liner on your way to London? Can you also deduce the costs on your next tax bill?

The IRS has special rules when it comes to luxury water travel. There is a daily limit on the amount that you can deduct. The amount varies depending on the time of the year. It is typically 200% of the highest federal per diem rate allowable during the time of your travel.

For instance, the highest federal per diem for the period January 1 to March 31 is $428. The daily limit on luxury water travel is double that amount, which is $856.

So let’s say that your total bill for a five-day cruise to London from New York for a business travel conducted in February is $5,000. You can only claim $4,280 as your deductible because you exceeded the daily limit of $856 per day.

  1. Shipping and Baggage. You can also deduct expenses that you incurred for shipping almost anything you need for your business or job while on travel. For instance, the $100 bill that you incurred for sending props or other materials required for a presentation.
  1. You can also deduct the full cost of the hotel room or other accommodations if your trip is overnight. Thus, you can reduce a $7000 per night stay at The Savoy on your next tax bill.
  1. You can deduce up to half of the cost of your meals if you are traveling for business. However, the meals should not be lavish or extravagant. There’s no clear-cut definition for a lavish or extravagant meal, but you can expect to get audited if you claimed a meal consisting of lobster and champagne as a deductible.
  1. You can also deduct any communication-related expenses like phone calls and faxes while you are traveling for business. This also includes international calls.
  1. Cleaning – this includes expenses for washing and ironing your clothes during the trip. Because you have to be presentable during your meetings with clients, right?
  2. Tips— you can also deduct the tips that you handed out to waiters, bellboys, and other workers.

Travel Considered Entirely for Business

The IRS maintains that only foreign travel which is spent solely for business is fully deductible. This means that if you spent your entire stay abroad on business-related activities, then you can claim all your travel expenses as tax deductible.

Since you did go spend time visiting friends and sightseeing during your trip, then you’ll have to allocate between tax deductible business expenses and the non-deductible personal ones.

But let’s face it–you do want to deduct the entire cost of transportation during your entire trip abroad, right?  You can deduce your travel expenses even if you didn’t spend the entire trip on business-related activities if you meet any of these conditions:

  1. You don’t have substantial control. According to the IRS, you don’t have substantial control over your trip if you are not a managing executive, or you are not related to your employer. The IRS defines a managing executive as an employee who has the authority and responsibility to decide on the necessity for business travel.

You also don’t have substantial control if you are merely an employee who was ordered by your boss to go to say, Paris, for a business trip.

But if you’re self-employed, then you might not satisfy this condition at all.  The IRS maintains that self-employed individuals and business owners have substantial control over arranging their business trips.

  1. You were outside the US for less than a week. The IRS will consider your travel entirely for business if you were out of the country for a week or less. However, you will have to count the day you return to the US, and not the day that you left.

This can get a bit confusing if you were traveling to different parts of the US before you left for London. For instance, say your home is in Denver. You left for New York on Tuesday, stayed there for a few days for a series of meeting, before flying to London on Saturday morning.

You had several business meetings in London on Sunday and Monday, then spent the next two days sightseeing. You went back to the US on Thursday before going back to Denver on a Saturday.

Although you were away from your home for more than a week, you were out of the US for less than a week. Remember that the IRS won’t count the day you left your home.

So, you may be able to claim the costs of your stay in London from Saturday and Sunday, but you won’t be able to do so for Tuesday and Wednesday.

  1. You spent less than a quarter of your travel on personal activities. But what if you spent more than a week outside the US? Does this mean that you can’t claim that as business related, and thus make you unqualified for tax deductibles?

You can, as long as you spent less than a quarter of your trip on personal activities.

So let’s say that you spent 14 days in London, and only got to see the sights and visit your friends in 1 to 2 days. You deduct the cost of the round trip plane fare, cost of meals, lodging, and other related expenses as mentioned earlier.

  1. Vacation was not a major consideration in arranging the trip. You can claim deductions on your tax bill if you can prove that a vacation was not a major consideration in arranging the trip.

Tips in Filing Business Travel Expenses

Now that you have an idea which business-related travel expenses you can claim as a tax deductible, here are some tips that you should remember so that you will be able to maximize your savings the next time you file your tax returns:

  1. Keep track of all your receipts and records. You can save a lot of time in looking for receipts when you keep every slip that you get during the course of your travel. You should also write on the back of each slip the location and date, the name of the person that you met, as well as the reason of the expense. This way, you won’t have to scavenge for slips when it is time to file your tax returns.
  1. Document everything. If you’re taking a client to a fancy dinner, you can claim that as a deductible. But you should be able to justify to the IRS that the nature of the meeting warranted such a fancy dinner. Thus it is recommended that you document the business you discussed so that you can justify the claim or pass an audit.

If you attended conferences or meetings while on travel, it would be a good idea to keep the programs or brochures you received. You can also keep the emails sent to you by people whom you met during the business meetings as proof to back up your claim.

Make it a habit to write down the names and business relationship of all the people you met during your travel. Write down their names as well as the business discussed.

You should also know that the IRS does not require receipts for travel expenses less than $75. So if you checked in a hotel for an overnight stay at a discounted price of $70, you’re not obligated to show the actual receipt.

  1. Try apps. If you have too many documents to keep track of, you might want to download and use apps for travel expenses. There are apps such as Tax Tracker that can help you in documenting business and travel expenses.

Mobile apps can monitor your travel expenses, time spent on the road, and miles traveled so you can file taxes and claim deductions quick, easy, and accurately.

  1. Be honest. The best way to avoid a date with the IRS is to be honest about declaring your tax returns. Deduct only the expenses that you are entitled to. Keep all supporting documents just in case you are called for audit. Remember, you not only end up losing deduction but also pay additional tax, interest, and penalties if the tax authorities find out that you make unsubstantiated claims.

Worse, the IRS may subject your tax return to further scrutiny. And you don’t want them to start digging.

The bottom-line is that you can make a lot of exemptions when you travel abroad for business purposes. Now that you know which travel expenses you can deduct, start saving those receipts and recording every expense. You’ll be surprised at the amount that you can save during the tax season.

Tax Deduction Strategies for Small Businesses

Apr 12, 2015 Posted by Sanjiv No Comments

As a small business owner, you can utilize a proactive approach and seize all opportunities available for conducting tax deductions as provided for under the law. Overlooking certain crucial write-offs leads to a bloated tax bill. Changes to the recent tax law have altered how Section 179 on deduction on bonus depreciation works. You can maximize write-offs for your home office and get deductions for business travel and automobiles, along with tax shelters for real estate property.

  1. Tapping into Major Tax Savings as per Section 179 Depreciation

A small business can benefit through huge increment in First-Year depreciation allowance as covered by Section 179. Following this law, you can deduct full cost of most used and new business personal property. The maximum amount provided for here got gradually boosted for 2009 from $25,000 to $250,000. Later on, the 2012 American Taxpayer Relief Act (ATRA) preserved the $500,000 maximum deduction adopted by the 2010 Small Business Jobs Act for two years. This provision was backdated to 1st of January 2012 and remained effective through 31st December 2013.

  1. Claiming Bonus Depreciation for All Qualified Assets

A business can lay claim to “bonus depreciation” for assets which are qualified and placed in service during the whole year. This business tax credit applies to the following:

  • Property with 20 years or below of cost recovery period
  • Qualified leasehold improvements
  • Depreciable software which is not amortized for over 15 years
  • Water utility property

 

  1. Triggering Quicker Write-Offs as per Section 179 Depreciation

It is possible to maximize Section 179 expensing deduction by undertaking some shrewd planning of your taxes through the ways below:

  • You can claim the allowance accrued through compensation payments if your company zeroes out its taxable income. The tax law limits annual deduction to amount of income taxable.
  • Boost the limit of your business income, which should include that accrued from your active businesses.
  • Maximize business percentage if claiming allowance for assets partially utilized for non-business reasons.

 

  1. Larger Deductions for ‘Heavy’ SUVs according to Section 179

If you opt to deduct annual expenditure as opposed to using standard mileage allowance, take note of an appreciably large tax advantage if owning heavy-duty vans, pickups and SUVs. These vehicles have gross vehicle weight rating or GVWR of over 6,000 pounds from the manufacturer and are viewed as “trucks” for purposes of taxation.

Such heavy-duty vehicles depreciate more rapidly than regular passenger vehicles, when used intensively for business purposes.

  1. Deductions of Fuel Tax for Business Vehicles

You may deduct automotive expenses via a standard mileage rate, set each year by the IRS. Doing this sets you free from having to account for actual expenditure incurred. For instance, business drivers got 56.5 cents for each mile in 2013.

  1. Tax-Free Family Vehicles as part of Business Deductions

Operation and maintenance costs are deductible for cars utilized in doing business, which includes depreciation. Your auto repair firm may provide cars for the whole family in this case. The business you own can deduct the entire amount of operating costs if your family members are employed by the enterprise. Car expenses which are deductable include:

  • Cost of gasoline
  • Repairs,
  • Insurance
  • Interest on car loans
  • Depreciation
  • Licenses
  • Taxes
  • Garage rents
  • Parking tolls and fees

 

  1. Writing off Home Furniture and Computer as part of Self-Employed Tax Deductions

Under Section 179, many taxpayers who are self-employed may deduct purchases for equipment, as opposed to capitalizing them. This section applies to the vast number of business assets, including furniture and computers meant for domestic use.

  1. Owning Your Business Premises

Once profits of your company start growing and business stabilizes, consider owning as opposed to renting your quarters. When evaluating the comparative costs, think of a reasonable time-period, such as of 10 years and factor into your calculations purchase price of your desired building at a prime location.

  1. Sheltering Real Estate Property of up to $25,000

Prices of real estate have recently gone down in many places, presenting great opportunities for investment. As well, business owners can enjoy tax shelters for investing in property. One has to own a 10 percent minimum portion of such investment property without involving limited partnership interests, apart from actively managing it. Business tax credit of 10 percent is available too for fixing old buildings, which changes to 20 percent if the building has historic significance.

  1. Turning Home into Rental Property

Many home owners have been adversely affected by recent devaluation in real estate property. This even gets worse due to inability of deducting loss from selling your principal residence.

Turning your home into rental property is a brilliant strategy in such situations. You only require holding it out for rent while relocating, before deducting losses once the place is sold. This is a shrewd tax move which capitalizes on an important distinction that applies to business or investment property.

Business Travellers Tax Deductions

Mar 17, 2014 Posted by Sanjiv No Comments

You might be surprised at some of the business expenses that are tax deductible for business travelers. It is important that you keep proper records and receipts. Handwritten notes are also important to keep track the reason for the expense, name of the person who met with you, the date and location.

There are many people who do not take advantage of all the deductions they are eligible for. Most of the time it is because they are lazy or do not keep proper records. All little extra time and organization can save you a lot of extra money.

If you travel for business and your employer does not reimburse all of your expenses, you are able to deduct any expenses you pay out-of-pocket that exceed 2% of your AGI. If you are the business owner or are self-employed, you do not even have to reach the 2% threshold.

Anything relating to your business is fair game including gasoline, airfare, fees for baggage, lodging, taxis, supplies, meals and phone calls. You are even allowed to deduct your dry cleaning, laundry service or bar tab while you are traveling.  The expenses have to be both necessary and ordinary. That means that they are typical business traveling expenses in your industry and necessary for your business. In other words, you need to prove you are trying to make money on the business trip.

What Happens When You Mix A Business Trip With Pleasure?

Business travelers need to be aware that the IRS is big on watching business travel related expenses because they know there is plenty of room for manipulation. They come across many tax payers that try to group personal expenses with business travel expenses. If you want to make the whole trip tax deductible, you need to make the primary purpose of the trip for business. You are able to take some personal time.

There is not anything wrong with mixing business with pleasure as long as you make the distinction very clear. Do not try to pass any personal expenses off as business expenses.

Also make sure that any conferences or conventions you attend are related directly to your profession or trade. The IRS wants to make sure they are really not disguised vacations. Make sure you keep any materials you receive at the convention.

What Is Deductible As A Business Related Travel Expense?

There are many things that you can deduct as a business related travel expense. If you attend a seminar or conference that lists an optional excursion for meet and greet purposes, you can deduct the expense even if is a balloon ride or trip to a winery. You need to keep the paperwork from the seminar listing the excursion. The trick is to keep meticulous records of all the expenses you incur when you are traveling for business.

If you cannot substantiate your tax deduction you will face serious penalties. In addition to losing the deduction and being required to pay the tax, you will have to pay interest and penalties. When your taxes are recalculated, you could get a 20% penalty for understatement if your taxes were understated by $5,000 or 10%.

It does not stop there. If the IRS finds a discrepancy, they will question what other deductions are personal or bogus. It is hard to get them to stop once they start digging.

Business Ttools

Dec 26, 2011 Posted by deepak No Comments

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Where is Your Tax Home?

May 25, 2017 Posted by Sanjiv 1 Comment

If your job requires you to travel from time to time, some of the expenses that you incur while traveling away from home may be entitled to tax deductions. In this sense, however, home does not necessarily refer to the place where you live but the place where you work. This is what the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) refers to as your tax home.

Determining where your tax home is is the first and most fundamental thing that you need to do if you want to determine if you are really traveling away from home.

Basically, your tax home refers to the general area of your workplace, regardless of where you actually live. So, if you work in New York, your tax home is New York.

Do not be confused if the place where you work is different from the place where you lay your head at night, because your tax home designation has nothing to do with where you live. In fact, you may travel miles from your permanent residence to your workplace every day, but your workplace will still and always be your tax home.

 Why You Need to Determine Your Tax Home

Often, when you attend a cocktail party and are asked where your home is, your answer is your current place of residence. However, that is not necessarily the case if the one asking you is from the IRS.  While their tax home is the same as their personal home for some taxpayers, the story is different for those who frequently travel for work or business. Don’t think that your tax home doesn’t deserve a thought, because it does matter especially for taxpayers like you.

According to the IRS, your travel can be considered deductible if your work or business requires you to be away from home longer than your normal work hours. Given that, it is clear that the key criterion in determining if your travel expenses are deductible is if your travel takes you away from your tax home.

Differentiating your tax home from your personal home is crucial because only those expenses incur while you are away from your tax home are considered by the law as deductible.

Your Tax Home, As Per the IRS

 IRS’ definition of tax home is plain and simple—Your tax home is your regular place of business or post of duty, regardless of where you maintain your family home.

Basically, your tax home covers the general area or the entire city where your business or workplace is located. If your office is somewhere in Cortlandt Street in New York, then your tax home is New York. If you travel to Louisville every week for your business but return to your permanent residence in Nashville on weekends, your tax home is still Louisville even if you call Nashville home.

 Why Your Workplace Must Be Your Tax Home

There is a reason the IRS requires every taxpayer to know their tax home, and there is a reason the tax home designation exists in the IRS law. The purpose of the tax home designation is for the deduction of travel expenses associated with work or business. This explains why in the eyes of the tax-collecting agency, your workplace is your home and not your apartment.

Imagine living miles outside Louisville but working in the city. If there is no tax home designation, then you must also be counting your house in Nashville out as your tax home. If that is the case, then theoretically, you can declare each and every expense you spend in Nashville as a business or work-related expense. The IRS is wise enough not to fall for such tricks.

When You Have More Than One Regular Place of Business

 Some taxpayers find it hard to determine their tax home because they have multiple places of business. Should that be your case, then your tax home must be your main place of business or the place where you conduct majority of your business. So, if you have offices in Nashville, Louisville and Franklin, then you must declare the place where you do most of your work as your tax home. In this case, the IRS expects you to consider the following in determining your tax home:

  • How much is the total time that you normally spend in each workplace?
  • How much work do you usually accomplish in each workplace?
  • How much money do you make in each workplace? Is the income you earn from conducting business there significant or insignificant?

Of the above mentioned criteria, the first one is the most important since the IRS states that the place where you conduct most of your business should be your tax home. Logically, the workplace where you spend most of your time is the same place where you conduct majority of your business.

Take this as an example. You reside in Birmingham since you have a seasonal job there for nine months each year. Annually, you earn around $50,000 from your seasonal job there. For the rest of the year which is equivalent to three months, you work in Atlanta where you earn $20,000. In that case, you may consider Birmingham as your main place of business since you spend most of your time there and you earn most of your significant income there.

When You Do Not Have a Regular or Main Place of Business

 Taxpayers who have more than one regular place of business and those who do not have a regular or main place of business usually have the same dilemma in determining their tax home. According to the IRS, for taxpayers whose nature of work causes them to not have a regular or main place of business, their tax home must be the location of their residence or where they regularly live.

Say you are a freelance web designer and do not have a regular office where you conduct business. Since your job requires you to visit offices of your clients to discuss business with them, and since you do not really have a workplace of your own, then your tax home is your house.

Freelance workers and travel bloggers are perfect examples of taxpayers who do not have a regular workplace, since they do not have a fixed place where they conduct business. In this case, you do most of the work at home so your tax home may be your actual home or your personal residence.

Take a look at these factors which the IRS considers in determining your tax home if you do not have a regular place of business:

  • You at least perform part of your business in the area of your personal residence and use it for lodging while conducting business.
  • There are living expenses in your personal residence that you are compelled to duplicate because your job or business needs you to travel away from home.
  • You do not abandon the area of both your place of lodging and personal residence are located, members of your family live with you in that residence, and you use that home for lodging most of the time.

Remember that you need to meet all the three criteria so you can consider your personal residence as your tax home. If you meet all the three factors, then any travel expense that you may incur away from your personal home can be considered deductible since they meet the “away from home” requirement for business travel deductions.

Unfortunately though, if you only meet one of the three factors, then the IRS can consider you as not having a true tax home so you can write off none of your travel expenses.

For example, your family residence is located in Indianapolis. In that city, you work 15 weeks a year. For the rest of the year, you work for the same employer in Cincinnati, where you dine in expensive restaurants and sleep in a rented apartment. For you, it doesn’t really matter whether you are in Indianapolis or in Cincinnati because your salary is the same whether you are in one city or the other. However, since you conduct most of your business in Cincinnati, that city is considered your tax home. That means that even if your expenses there are bigger than when you are in Indianapolis, you cannot deduct any of your expenses for meals and lodging while you are there. When you return to your family home in Indianapolis, you are away from your tax home so you can deduct the cost of your round trip between Indianapolis and Cincinnati, as well as part of your family’s living expenses for meals and lodging while working in your personal home.

When You Do Not Have a Fixed Workplace and a Fixed Home Address

 In determining your tax home, there is something much worse than having more than one regular workplace or not having a regular workplace at all– Not having a regular place of business or post of duty and no personal residence at the same time.

While determining your tax home is not that easy if you have more than one regular workplace, it becomes easy when you finally determine which among your workplaces is your tax home. And while determining your tax home is not that easy when you do not have a regular workplace, it becomes easy when you have a personal residence which you can call your tax home.

However, things become a bit complicated when you do not have a regular place of business and you do not have a place where you regularly live at the same time. In that case, the IRS considers you as an itinerant.

The IRS law states that the tax home of an itinerant or a transient is wherever he works. If you belong to this category, then you are not entitled to travel expense deductions because no matter where you work, you are never considered to be traveling away from home.

Since as an itinerant, everywhere you work is your tax home, you are never really away from home, which means that you cannot write off any of your travel expenses.

An outside salesman is an example of an itinerant. Say you are an outside salesman whose sales territory covers different states. The main office of your employee is in Memphis but you do not work or conduct any business there. Your work assignments are relatively temporary and you have no idea about the locations of your future assignments. Your sister is renting out a room somewhere in Saint Louis so you stay there for a couple of weekends each year, but you do not conduct any business in that area. You do not pay for your accommodation there either. Since you do not satisfy any of the previously mentioned factors that will make your regular home your tax home, then you are considered an itinerant and therefore have no deductible travel expenses.

 When Traveling is Considered Traveling Away from Your Tax Home

 Regardless of which of the abovementioned categories you fall under, all the said criteria boil down to the fact that determining your tax home is critical in determining your tax liability when traveling. Once you have already identified your tax home, it will become easier for you to know which of your travel expenses you should write off and which you should not.

It is also worth mentioning that these tax home rules are the same whether you are an employee or a self-employed individual, although there are certain instances when the degree to which you can write off your business travel expenses may differ.

For instance, employees can only deduct work-related expenses that they have not reimbursed from their employers, while self-employed individuals can deduct the full amount of their travel expenses as long as they are incurred away from their tax homes. In any case, remember to keep well-organized records like receipts, checks and other documents to support your deduction claims.

Visiting Your Dream Destination While Winning the Audit: Here’s How You Do It

May 8, 2017 Posted by Sanjiv No Comments

Taking a trip to the destination of your dreams sounds fun, but nothing is more fun that taking a trip while winning the resulting audit at the same time.

Yes, you read it right. Turning your vacation into an honest-to-goodness tax deduction is possible. In fact, you can travel throughout the Mediterranean with no or very little travel costs. The key is by making your trip either a passive or an active business trip. Remember that the only way you can reduce your transportation expenses is by making business the primary purpose of your trip.

As a business owner, you know that taking a vacation doesn’t come easy. Aside from the fact that you don’t have paid vacation leaves, you can’t just entrust your business to someone else while you’re away. However, your advantage is that when it comes to business, you are free to mix pleasure with business. If you do it right, you make it possible for you to enjoy a vacation while reducing your tax bill.

 Why Need to Make Your Trip a Business Trip

 If your purpose is to lower your travel expenses, making your vacation a business trip is a must. This is because it becomes a lot easier to deduct transportation expenses if the purpose of your trip is business.

You should also not forget to count up the number of days allotted for business and for personal activities in your planned trip. As a rule of thumb, make sure that majority of your travel days is spent on business activities. A weekend that is squeezed in between workdays can also be counted as business days. Hence, you can fly to Hawaii on a Thursday and meet a client the following day, stay there for the entire weekend, have meetings again on Monday and Tuesday, and fly back home the following day. That way, you’ve already had seven business days and you can enjoy Hawaii and still expense your transportation costs.

 How to Make Your Vacation Look like a Business Trip

 Now that you know that the key to reducing your travel tax is by writing it off as a business trip, the next thing you have to figure out is how to actually do that. Well, of course you cannot just take off for your dream destination with your business cards and pretend that you are going there for pure business.

Today, for your trip to be considered a business trip, you have to have a prior set business purpose. That is as per the requirements set by the IRS. Simply put, you need to schedule at least one business appointment before leaving for your trip. If you fail to do it, then you will never be able to expense your transportation costs.

There is nothing wrong with deducting part or your entire trip by deducting your travel costs as business expenses. In fact, this is the reason many professional groups host their annual conventions in popular tourist spots. Combining your vacation with business travel is not a bad idea at all, as long as you do it right.

 The IRS Rule on Travel Expenses and Deductions

 If you love the idea of traveling with minimal travel costs, it is necessary that you identify which among your travel expenses are tax-deductible and which are not. Once you have identified that, then you can finally let your tax savings pay for the deductible part of your trip.

Writing off some of your travel expenses may invite scrutiny, but don’t hesitate taking deductions if you think you are entitled to them. However, you have to be careful when it comes to this part and remember the IRS rule. You cannot simply claim that your trip is a business trip just because you have to visit an office somewhere. The IRS made it clear: “The scheduling of incidental business activities during a trip, such as viewing videotapes or attending lectures dealing with general subjects, will not change what is really a vacation into a business trip.”

Expenses that are Considered Deductible

 You know that in every trip, your transportation costs–taxi fare, airfare, airport parking, etc.)–make up a huge part of your travel expenses. If you are good and careful enough, you can fully offset such costs so long as you meet the criteria set by the IRS. Aside from your transportation costs though, there are other expenses that can be added up, too.

The IRS Pub 463 has laid out the details when it comes to these expenses, but just to give you an idea, here are some of the basic things that you should take note of:

  • For each day that is considered business day, you are allowed to deduct the entire cost for your lodging, car rentals and tips. That means that if your weeklong trip to Hawaii includes five days of business and two days for your personal getaway, then you can legally deduct your hotel bill for all those five business days.
  • For each day that is considered business day, you can deduct 50 percent of the total amount you spent for food.
  • You can also deduct other miscellaneous expenses that are “ordinary and necessary” to your travel, like dry cleaning and baggage fees.
  • The catch is, you cannot deduct the amount spend for your family, in case they joined you in your trip.

 Simple Steps to Follow When Writing Off a Trip

  1.  Choose any place in the U.S. where you want to go.
  2. Decide how you want to write off your trip–as an active or a passive trip.
  3. Find a conference, convention or any event in that destination that is related to your business or profession.
  4. Book the trip.

 Things to Remember if You Want to Write Off Your Trip

 You have to go a long way to be able to write off your trip. The IRS has existing rules stipulating which particular expenses can be written off and which cannot, so it takes a dose of wisdom to avail of tax deductions without a hitch.

  1.  S. Trip vs International Trip. Deductions for business trips within the U.S. differ from deductions for international trips. If your trip is pure business and is just within the U.S., then you can expect your transportation to be fully deducted both ways. However, if your business trip is out of the country, then it has to be at least 75 percent business to be written off your plane ticket. If you go less than 75 percent, then the amount to be deducted will be just the percentage related to business.
  1. The Importance of Traveling via a U.S.-registered cruise. In the event that you are in a business-related cruise, make sure that you are aboard a ship that is registered in the U.S. and not in any other country. However, the rule is that a business-related cruise in a U.S. ship entitles you to only a deduction of up to $2,000 a year, regardless of how long or how frequent your trip is. Also, this has to come with a detailed written statement with tax return.
  1. On Overstaying. If you stay in Hawaii for a full week but the days dedicated for business is just five days, that’s fine. You do not need to work all day and end your staycation as soon as your business is done. Remember that spending a few more days in your destination will not disqualify you for deductions, but you have to ensure that your primary purpose for that trip is business and everything is well-documented.
  1. Family’s Expenses. When it comes to the expenses incurred by your family throughout the trip, the story is different. Unless they are employees in your company too, any of your family members is not entitled to a deduction because you cannot deduct expenses for anyone who is not really part of the business trip.

If you want a way out of this rule, the trick you can do is to find a means through which you can overlap what you have to pay for yourself with what a family member can pay for himself. For example, when you drive him in your car, your deductible transportation also gets him to the destination since both of you are riding the same car. Same trick applies if you share a single hotel room. It is important to note, however, that the costs incurred for the added occupants, the need for a larger room, for instance, are not covered by the deductions.

 

  1.  Miscellaneous Fees. We’ve been talking here of transportation costs like airfare, hotel expenses and food. But how about other fees that you may incur in the course of your travel? Well, it is normal for any trip to rack up some incidental costs, including laundry charges, tips, taxi fares, internet access fees and phone calls. The rule for such fees is simple. If these expenses are related to your business trip in any way, then you are free to write them off. Otherwise, you pay for them.
  2. Meal Deductions. When you go on a business trip with your associates, you are entitled to a deduction of 50 cents per dollar, which means you get to eat out at only half of your total meal cost.
  3. Record-keeping. As previously mentioned, the key to getting as much deductions as possible for your trip is to be careful. Since many business organizations abuse this area of the law, it is highly likely for the IRS to interrogate you when it comes to your deductions. When that time comes, you have to be ready to justify everything. Make sure that you keep all the necessary records, which do not only include the receipts but everything that will prove that you were actually out there for a business trip. Hence, you have to be meticulous in keeping even your itineraries and agendas.
  4.  Extravagant Expenses. You don’t want to be called an abuser of the law, so be reasonable. While you are free to write off some of your expenses since it’s a business trip, the IRS has the power to foul on whatever expenses it may find too extravagant. As the law stipulates, your expenses must be reasonable based on facts and circumstances.

On Documenting Your Trip

 As previously mentioned, you have to document everything so you will have something to present in case the IRS asks you to prove that your trip was actually a business trip. This may sound a bit demanding, but if that’s too big a deal to you, here’s the deal: You don’t really need to keep a pocketful of receipts for expenses smaller than $75.

While the IRS does not require you to keep receipts for a travel expense that’s worth under that amount, that doesn’t necessarily mean that you are already off the hook when it comes to record-keeping. Remember, your goal is to make as much expenses deductible as possible, so be responsible enough to document all your deductible expenses. That means if you stayed at a hotel that’s worth $75, you still ought to have a copy of its receipt so you can expense it.

Tax Strategy

 The only best way for you to avoid trouble when it comes to tax strategy is to be honest. Do not deduct expenses that you are not entitled to and keep all the necessary documents that you will eventually need to back up your claim for deductions. Remember that substantiating your claim is important because if you fail to document your expenses, you are entitled to serious penalties such as losing all the deductions altogether and having to pay additional tax on top of penalties and interest.

The bottom line here is that there are existing rules on travel deductions and you’re not supposed to push these rules. However, there is no reason that you cannot tack on some days of fun when you are out there for business.

Thinking About Becoming An Enrolled Agent ?

Mar 25, 2017 Posted by Sanjiv No Comments

 Do you want to be called a tax expert? Is it your goal to represent taxpayers before the IRS? Do you desire to be respected as a professional?  If so, you should work towards becoming an enrolled agent or EA.

Enrolled agents are specialists who represent the cream of the crop when it comes to taxation. They are the only federally recognized tax practitioners who can represent taxpayers before the Internal Revenue Service.

EAs and CPAs can help taxpayers facing the various tax problems:

  • Tax evasion
  • Tax fraud
  • Tax debt
  • Failure to file/pay tax penalties
  • IRS audit
  • Tax liens
  • Tax levies
  • Unfiled tax returns
  • Appeals
  • Collection issues

There are only less than 50,000 practicing EAs in the United States, according to the National Association of Enrolled Agents (NAEA).

The relatively small number of practicing enrolled agents in the US can be attributed to the expertise necessary to become one, as well as the stringent requirements for maintaining the license.

While it isn’t easy to become an enrolled agent, the rewards are more than worth it, so to speak.  Enrolled agents are highly in demand. They are needed by law and accounting firms.  These professionals can also find employment in banks and investment firms. Some pros also choose to put up their own private practice.

How to Become an Enrolled Agent

 Unlike other professional designations, there is no educational requirement for a person wanting to become an enrolled agent.

However, you must prove your knowledge on tax related matters by either passing the EA exam or working with the IRS for at least five years.

The EA exam is also called the Special Enrollment exam. It consists of three parts, with each one testing your knowledge on taxation.

The first part concerns individual taxpayers, covering sections on income and assets, deduction and credits, taxpayer information, taxation and advice, and returns for individuals.

The second part focuses on business entities with sections on businesses, specialized returns and tax payers, and business financial information. It is widely considered by EAs as the toughest section in the exam.

The third part focuses on representation, practice, and procedure.

Aside from passing the test, you will be subjected to a thorough investigation conducted by the IRS.

Maintaining Certification 

If you successfully passed the exam, you will be federally recognized as an enrolled agent. However, you will need to do the following to maintain your certification:

  1. Renew your Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN) annually.
  2. Renew your status as an EA every three years
  3. Undergo 72 hours of continuing education (CE) every three years. There’s a minimum requirement of 16 hours of CE per year, with at least two hours on ethics.  The need to undergo at least two hours of ethics training annually is in line with the Department of Treasury’s Circular 230.

 Joining Professional Organizations

 There are numerous professional organizations of enrolled agents. The NAEA is perhaps the biggest and most prestigious of them.

The Washington, DC-based organization aims to promote the highest level of professionalism, skills, and knowledge among its members. It is also a staunch advocate of taxpayer rights.

Established in 1972 as an offshoot of the Chicago-based National Association of Enrolled Federal Tax Accountants, the NAEA has grown into a large organization with more than 11,000 members.

Those members are demanded to take 30 hours of CE every calendar year, or 14 hours more than the 16 hours set by the IRS. They are then required to report the number of hours of CE they’ve garnered in the past year for renewal of their membership in the upcoming year.

The NAEA lets its members earn missing CE hours in the next calendar year to make up for the less than 30 hours that they accumulated in the previous year.

NAEA Membership Benefits

 While there are other professional groups of enrolled agents, the NAEA is widely considered to be the most prestigious in the country. Aside from completing annual continuing education that surpasses the requirements of the IRS, NAEA members are known to abide by a code of ethics. They also conduct themselves in a very professional manner.

Once you become an enrolled agent, you should aim to join the NAEA. Becoming a member of this organization opens the door to numerous professional benefits such as:

  1. Continuing education. Members of NAEA can participate in seminars, conferences, and conventions that can update their skills and knowledge, and set them up for success. Some of the more common CE topics include ethics, tax preparation, accounting, advanced IRS summons, among others.
  1. Participation in year-long events. NAEA conducts seminars, conventions, and meetings during the entire year. These events provide networking and educational opportunities to its members.

A key event in the NAEA calendar is the NAEA national conference. This is the only annual educational event in the country designed particularly for Circular 230 practitioners looking to focus on client representation before the IRS. The event is anchored by the National Tax Practice Institute.

  1. Enhanced reputation. NAEA works to spread the word about the benefits of hiring an enrolled agent. It taps both traditional media such as print and broadcast and social media to effectively increase the public’s knowledge about enrolled agents, and thereby enhance the potential value of EA to taxpayers. Simply put, the organization strives to make the taxpaying public more appreciative of the value of enrolled agents.
  1. Information sharing. The NAEA offers a tax knowledge base where members can look for answers to some of the more frequently asked questions of tax practitioners.
  1. Marketing tools and membership discounts. The organization offers discounts for office supplies and software that their members can use in their respective offices.

Participating in NAEA Courses

 The NAEA as well as its state affiliates are known to host numerous continuing education (CE) courses. These courses are held all year-round and provide an opportunity for current EAs to hone their skills and keep themselves updated on the latest taxation issues.

Should you become an EA and eventually a member of the NAEA, you can browse the organization’s website, www.naea.org to find and apply for an organization-sanctioned course.

The website features the “Continuing Education” section where you and other EAs associated with the group can learn more about the requirements for continuing education credits.

There’s also the “Calendar” section in the website where NAEA events for the entire year are posted.  The events range from quarterly meetings, annual conventions, and seminars. Attending these events not only provide enrolled agents with the opportunity to earn CE credits, but also get some relaxation in a world-class resort.

For 2017, some of the cities where NAEA courses are scheduled to be held are Orlando, Las Vegas, Denver, and Reno.

Enrolled agents, thus, can improve their skills and knowledge, maintain their certification, and renew their NAEA membership while getting treated to a few days of leisure and vacation.

From a professional standpoint, NAEA courses also provide enrolled agents with the opportunity to network with some of the most dedicated tax professionals and learn from accomplished  tax authorities in the country.

NAEA and its state affiliates, in fact, offer its courses even to non-members.  There are seminars which are open to enrolled agents who are not members of the NAEA and its state affiliates. Signing up for a NAEA course may also benefits like complimentary membership, special member discounts, and access to special publications.

It is also possible to get discounts if a group of enrolled agents participates in a NAEA course. The NAEA and its state affiliates usually give discounts to groups of three or more colleagues who are joining a seminar, convention, or conference.

Enrolled agents can also attend one or two days of multiple-day seminars. The NAEA offers one-day only rates for most of its courses, meaning that EAs don’t have to attend the entire course.

The easiest way to register to any NAEA course is through the Internet. The NAEA website, as well as those of NAEA’s state affiliates, usually have downloadable PDF registration forms which enrolled agents can fill out to signify their participation in a particular course.

How to Save in NAEA Courses Participation

 Truth to be told, participation fees in NAEA courses and events aren’t cheap. The cost of participating in a continuing education course can run to hundreds of dollars. The cost may also be affected by other factors such as the location as well as the number of days of the event.

Yet enrolled agents can deduct the costs of their participation in NAEA courses in their next tax returns. After all, these are considered travel expenses which are defined by the IRS as common and accepted in a trade or business.

Enrolled agents can claim most of the expenses they incur while attending a NAEA organized event or conference. They can write off registration costs, lodging expenses, 50 percent of their meals, and incidental expenses.

Communication-related expenses during a NAEA convention, such as business calls and fax machine fees, may also be written off by enrolled agents. The same goes for other ordinary and necessary expenses related to the business travel like dry cleaning and laundry as well as tips paid for any expenses during the convention.

Transportation expenses can also be written off by enrolled agents who participate in a NAEA course. These include airfare, bus fare, or taxi fare between the enrolled agent’s home and the location of the event.

Since most NAEA events are held in the United States, enrolled agents should have no problems claiming the expenses they incurred in participating in a NAEA continuing education course. However, it is worth mentioning that even conventions held outside the United States may be deducted as a legitimate travel expense.

These include countries such as Aruba, Bermuda, Bahamas, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Republic of Palau, Panama, Trinidad & Tobago, Jamaica, and Honduras, among others.

Of course, enrolled agents know very well that there are also other factors to be considered in justifying the location of a convention. These include, among others, the residence of the participants, purpose and activities of the convention, and locations of previous events.

Claiming travel expenses in the next tax return isn’t the only way for enrolled agents to save the next time they participate in a NAEA course. They can also seek the assistance of professional EA groups. There are numerous organizations of EAs – and not just the NAEA– that offer scholarship programs to  both current and aspiring enrolled agents.

For example, the California Society of Enrolled Agents offers scholarship to California residents wishing to pursue accounting, finance, and other courses in preparation for the special enrollment preparation.

It also offers scholarship to current EAs in California who wish to take up courses like Tax Court in their desire to broaden their knowledge in the field of taxation.

The NAEA, meanwhile, has its own scholarship program funded by its members. This grant covers the registration expenses of educational programs offered at NAEA conferences.

Joining Online Courses

Enrolled agents may also join online courses or webinars offered by the NAEA.  Online courses are a lot cheaper than seminars, conventions, and other continuing education classes offered by the organization.

Moreover, these courses are suited for enrolled agents who don’t have the time to attend seminars or meetings organized by the NAEA. Participants of online courses can also earn continuing education credits.

There is also a lot of variety in the topics discussed in online courses. Some may be aimed at enhancing the knowledge and skills of enrolled agents such as seminars on tax update, while others may be focused on enabling EAs to improve their practice such as using social media to reach out to more potential customers.

There are a lot of career opportunities awaiting enrolled agents in the United States. Organizations particularly the NAEA are more than willing to help professional growth of EAs. One way to  achieve this is the offering of various NAEA courses such as seminars, conventions, and meetings.  Enrolled agents should be pragmatic enough to grab the opportunity and participate in NAEA courses, whether held in or outside the US.

tax audits

Dealing with IRS and other Tax Audits

Sep 7, 2016 Posted by Sanjiv No Comments

It’s one of those fears that bog the minds of rich people and even ordinary taxpayers—getting audited by the IRS. But what are the chances that you’ll be audited by the government for your tax returns?

The chances of a tax audit are very low these days. Taxpayers with moderate income levels have a 1 percent chance; while those earning $1 million and up were audited at a 7.5 percent clip.

For companies, the rates are also low. Firms with total assets of less than $10 have a 1 percent chance. Those with assets between $1 and $5 million have a 1.2 percent rate, while firms with asset size of between $5 and $10 million have a 1.9 percent chance of being audited. Even the middle-sized firms or those with assets between $10 and $50 million had a low 6.2 percent chance of being audited.

Sure, the chances of getting a visit from the IRS have shrunk to all-time lows. But that should not be enough reason for you to be complacent. It still pays to know what to do just in case someone from the IRS knocks at your door or you get a letter from the said agency.

Individual Tax Audit

You may not be a millionaire but there are conditions that can increase your risks of being visited by the IRS:

• Being self-employed. There are lots of write-offs that self-employed taxpayers can claim, unlike most employees. These range from a home office to the use of a car, and the IRS may have queries about these claims.
• You have itemized deductions that are a lot higher than those of taxpayers with comparable incomes. The tax department will likely flag your return when it notices that there’s a big difference between your write-offs and averages.

Should you get a notification that you are to be audited, don’t panic. Keep in mind that the audit will be done in a professional manner. And if you can give the IRS people the right paperwork then you will be off the hook, so to speak.

You must not also think of ignoring the IRS. Your problem won’t go away. Worse, your interest and penalties will continue to accrue. So the earlier you deal with it, the better.

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Types of Audit

There are three types of audit. The more common is correspondence audit, which is handled by a way. According to the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, 76 percent of individual audits were of this kind.

These computer-generated correspondences may tell you that there was a mathematical error on your return, or that your return wasn’t the same as the 1099 statements that the IRS received from your bank or broker. In these cases, you simply send the money that you owe.

The letter may also dispute a tax break that you claimed. If you can’t prove that you were correct, then you will have to pay additional taxes.

But what if you’re right? You’ll have to collate the right paperwork then send it back to the IRS through certified days within 30 days of receipt of the letter. You’ll also have to prepare a letter that includes a copy of the correspondence audit plus your reference number.

In some cases, you imply have to go back and get receipts. But there are cases when you can’t do that. Instead, you may have to get a written acknowledgment from the charity that you gave to in order to claim a charitable contribution.

This is a task that you can handle yourself, especially if the issue is simple enough to reply to. You may ask a tax pro to help you out, but you’ll obviously have to pay him or her for the service

If you feel you are deserving of the tax break but you want a stronger case or reply to the IRS, a tax professional can be of significant help. He or he can prepare your return respond to the agency, and give you a better shot at defending your case.

The second type is field audit, which is conducted in person at your home or at IRS offices. However, the chances of an IRS guy dropping by your home are very low these days. The agency is no longer conducting a lot of field audits because these often mean additional expenses.

This type of audit is conducted when the IRS has lots of questions about your return. The agency may also resort to this type of audit when there is a certain write-off that is difficult to handle by mail.

The field audit in an IRS office shouldn’t last more than four hours. However there will likely be a follow-up visit, or the agency would require you to pass additional paperwork.

The last type is the ‘random’ audit. Among the three types of audit, this is the least likely that the IRS will conduct. You have a very slim chance of being selected for this audit.

But then again, it pays to be prepared.

The random audit is perhaps the most detail-oriented and intrusive of the three types of audit. IRS agents may even ask for your birth certificate and marriage license just to check your filing status.

This is also the type of audit where a professional expert can help you. There’s a good chance that something will happen at the audit that can cause the agency to demand you to pay more. With the help of a pro, you’ll be ready just in case the proverbial can of worms is opened.

Attitude During the Audit

Whether you are going to the IRS office or accompanied by a tax pro, you need to behave professionally during the audit. Don’t become argumentative, and treat the agents with respect.

Be honest and truthful with your answers. But you should also answer straight to the point. Avoid talking too much because the more you talk, the more questions that the agency will have.

You should also come to the office prepared and organized. You don’t want to upset the agent with your messy folder and jumbled receipts.

If you are unable to provide the document the agent is looking for, politely ask if there’s any other documentation that you may provide in lieu of the document. For example, you claimed the business use of a vehicle but couldn’t show receipts for gas. Maybe a calendar of your business meetings may be accepted as a substitute.

You can go through the appeals process if you disagree with the contention of the agent. This is where a tax pro can help you as he or she would be able to handle this step.

So what happens if you have to pay the IRS more money but you don’t have cash? You have three choices—one is to pay with a credit card, although you will have to pay a convenience fee of around 2.35 percent. You can also for an installment agreement or request for a compromise.

Business IRS Audits

Again, the chances of a business getting audited by the IRS have gone down in the past few years. But this still should not give your company a false sense of security.

What are the possible issues that the IRS will look into your company’s tax returns? Here are some of the red flags that should make the IRS agents knock on your door:

1. Net loss in more than two of the past five years.
2. Excessive deductions for travel, business meals, and entertainment
3. High salaries paid to shareholders
4. Shifting income to tax-exempt organizations in a bid to avoid payment of taxes
5. Claiming 100 percent business use of a vehicle

Like in individual tax audits, it is important for a business to be prepared if it has been picked for an audit. There’s a silver lining to being audited, as if the agency’s findings show that there is no change to the tax liability then the business won’t be audited on the same issue for the next year.

Hiring a tax professional is the first step that you need to undertake if your business has been pinpointed by the IRS for auditing. Don’t be anxious in thinking that this will indicate that your business is guilty, after all, the IRS is very much used to this practice. A tax professional can help you through the audit.

You can even sign a power-of-attorney agreement to give your tax professional the legal authority to deal with the IRS directly. This is ideal if you are unsure of what to say and what not to say during the audit. This basically takes you out of the loop and puts your tax professional in.

But there are three things that you, as the business owner, should remember when your business is faced with the prospect of being audited by the IRS:

1. Review the audit letter carefully.

An IRS agent won’t just barge into your door and announce an audit. The agency will send an audit letter to your office informing you that your firm has been picked for the audit.

Be cautious with scammers who will masquerade as the IRS by sending you email messages or leaving phone messages. Those guys will attempt to hack your personal data. The real IRS doesn’t communicate through email or phone.

Once you receive the letter, open it promptly. Read and understand what the IRS needs from you.

If your company doesn’t have a financial adviser, you can hire an accountant or tax professional to help you review the review letter. He or she will also identify the issues that the agency has flagged.

Don’t ignore the letter because the IRS will not go away. Worse, the auditor may become more suspicious and even antagonistic.

2. Organize your records.

The next step is to organize your records. Gather and organize all your business records from the previous tax year even before you meet with the tax professional and IRS auditor.

These records range from receipts and invoices from income and expenses, accounting books and ledgers, bank statements, leases or titles for properties and hard copies of tax-prep data. You should also make sure that you have the specific documents requested by the IRS for review.

3. Answer the questions honestly.

During the audit, the IRS agent will ask you a lot of questions about the information reported on your business tax return. Simply answer the questions of the auditor—no more, no less. Giving any information that you are not required to give may put you in more hot water.

Similar to dealing with individual tax audits, providing unasked-for information may give the auditor more questions to ask. The last thing that you want to happen is for the auditor to uncover more issues about your tax returns. IRS auditors won’t forgive tax debt or mistakes, so any admission that you may have will be used against you.

Be straightforward in replying to the questions. However, don’t manufacture excuses. IRS agents would know if you’re making any.

Also, don’t be antagonistic with the auditor. It would only make things worse for you and your business.

In order to avoid future audits, you should track bank transfers and other financial records aside from receipts. Anything that you cannot explain on the standard IRS form must be explained on paper. Of course, double-check all your calculations before filing your returns.

Aside from keeping proper documentation, you can avoid getting picked for an audit by deducting ordinary and necessary business expenses as allowed by the IRS. So even if your company is chosen for an audit, you have nothing to be afraid of.

Indeed, getting a letter from the IRS informing that you are to be audited can be very worrisome. But if you know how to deal with tax audits, then you don’t have anything to be afraid of. It also helps to have a tax professional guiding you to be assured that you can respond to whatever audit findings the IRS guys have with you or your business.

Board Meeting Deduction

Apr 1, 2015 Posted by Sanjiv No Comments

Board Meeting Deduction

The expenses related to the working of a board of directors are evidently termed as ordinary and necessary expenditure of conducting business as per Income Tax rules and are thus deductible. A board meeting is specifically meant for company directors. It is not a general body meeting where only the shareholders meet; but it is a meeting where the directors discuss about various issues and future prospects of the company. The legal responsibilities the board members depend on the nature of the organization, and the jurisdiction. Board meeting is organized at a regular interval and is headed by the chairperson of the organization who is also responsible to maintain a formal atmosphere during the meeting. It comprises of a fixed number of eligible members (Directors only) and everyone is bound by the rules, regulations and any resolutions that is passed in the meeting. The meeting is conducted under the presence of President, Vice President, Treasurer and Secretary.   Other official members may also be present. Recording the Minutes of the Meeting is important.

In a board meeting, the directors do the following:

  •  Evaluating the company’s growth, success and profit and governing of the organization
  • Establishing company policy and objective
  • Accounting to the shareholders and report about the accomplishment of the organization
  • Approving annual budget and ensuring organization’s capability of producing funds
  • Setting salaries of the management and employees

To legitimately write off taxes, expenditure in business should be simple and necessary to be deductible. A simple expense is one that is ordinary and common, and is accepted in industries. A necessary expense is one that is helpful and apt for the business. An expense does not have to be imperative to be regarded as necessary. Although an expense may be both ordinary and necessary, sometimes one may not be allowed to deduct it in the year paid or incurred. At times it is not allowed to deduct the expense at all.

Like many other business expenses, board meeting expenses fall under the category of necessary business expense and is thus deductible from taxable income.  However, to be deductible, board meeting expenses must be related to business activities. Some such expenses are travel expenses incurred due to traveling to and from the board meetings, hotel stays, food expenses, supply purchases, compensation for services and many such expenses can be written off business expenditure if you can give proof that the expenses were solely for the business purpose. Tax cannot be deducted from expenses that are made for an official’s personal use and where there is no interest of the company. In case of phone bills (if there is personal and business usage), then the taxpayer can only deduct the portion of the bill which is used for business.

Keeping a record of the expenses is very essential to write off tax. They also need to be classified properly as travel-related expenses, dining expenses and entertainment expenses. The company’s accountant must be responsible for identifying, classifying and deducting board expenses. When documents are to be produced to IRS it becomes easy if all the documents are recorded and are in place. The board of directors also needs to determine how to maintain the process of documenting expenses, which includes filling reimbursement forms, keeping a track of receipts and keeping a proper travel log, etc.

Tax Deduction: Entertainment for Customers and Clients

Mar 25, 2015 Posted by Sanjiv No Comments

A crucial part of business is building and nurturing relationships with clients. While doing this, the business owners meet clients, customers and business partners during social events and occasions. The expenses incurred on these are considered by the IRS for tax exemption. Tax deductions and considerations are very essential part of business interactions. Business owners and employees are allowed to take a federal tax deduction that amounts to half of their qualifying costs when they entertain their customers and clients. Although the IRS does not allow complete tax deduction, but approximately 50% of deduction is allowed on all kinds of entertainment. The pointers mentioned below would help to understand how tax deduction would help in entertainment for customers and clients.

  •  Expenses incurred in almost all kinds of business recreational activities that involve a business owner and clients can be considered for tax deduction. Entertainment deduction is applicable if that form of entertainment relates to the specific business field. Activities include going to nightclubs, theaters, films, fishing trips, hunting, athletic club and even vacations.
  • As per the IRS, meals, beverages, tips and taxes combine to form entertainment expenses. Tax deduction helps entertainment of customers and clients whereby business owner and employees pay on behalf of their clients. In return they get 50% deduction on the meal prices. When both the parties are found to divide the bills, neither of the two can avail tax deduction of the meal. Thus, if you plan to take your client out for a lunch in order to discuss a new project and the objectives, you can go for deduction in taxable income. However, if you are self-employed, then IRS would let you deduct a part of the entire lunch bill as you travel or meals and entertainment business cost when you successfully comply with certain criteria.
  • Tax deduction for entertainment of customers and clients can happen when entertainment fulfills personal and also business agenda. In such a case, an individual would get a deduction for a part of expenses that he incurs for business reasons. Such business expenses include the taxes and tips that are paid on meals, room rents, parking fees and nightclub cover expenses.
  • It may happen that an employee pays for business-related entertainment from his pocket and later gets reimbursement from the employer. But in a situation where the employee does not get the cost reimbursed by the employer, then the former can get a 50% deduction on tax for the difference that the employer compensated in return and the actual amount that he paid from his own pocket.
  • Tax deduction clause can help you in keeping customers and clients entertained if you keep all the records. You should keep tangible records handy at the time of IRS audit. Such records include itemized restaurant receipts and credit card slips correlating to the meals during a business meeting.

 

But just because tax deduction can help entertainment for customers and clients, you cannot exploit it.